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Backflow Prevention Assembly Test Report

BACKFLOW PREVENTION ASSEMBLY TEST REPORT

 

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality requires all community water systems to maintain a cross-connection control program for protection of the system that distributes drinking water to your home or business. The cross-connection control program includes:

  • Inspections of the customer's private plumbing to identify and prevent cross-connections, and potential contamination, including contamination by illegal materials containing lead.
  • Required installation and testing of backflow-prevention assemblies where appropriate. The costs associated with the program are borne by the customer.

Some Public water systems are subject to a plumbing code that may have more stringent requirements than the TCEQ. TCEQ regulations are a minimum.

WHAT IS A CROSS-CONNECTION?

A physical connection between drinkable water and liquid or gas that could make the water unsafe to drink. Wherever there is a cross-connection, there is a potential threat to public health from the liquid or gas contaminants.

WHAT IS BACKFLOW?

Water flowing in the opposite of its intended direction, either from a loss of pressure in the supply lines or an increase in pressure on the customer's side.

COMMON CROSS-CONNECTIONS:

  • Garden hose: Backflow through cross-connections can occur at your homes if you leave a garden hose turned on and submerged in a swimming pool, or insert it into your car's radiator to flush out the antifreeze, or attach it to an insecticide sprayer. That material could siphon back into your drinkable water.
  • Private well: Backflow can also occur if a pump supplied from an untreated water supply, such as a private well, were connected to the drinkable water supply. The untreated water could be pumped into the drinkable water supply which serves your home and the public water system.
  • Lawn sprinkler system: TCEQ regulations require that all lawn sprinkler systems be connected through a mechanical backflow-prevention assembly-without which, the stagnant water from the sprinkler system could be drawn into the drinkable water supply for your home.

HOW CAN BACKFLOW BE PREVENTED?

Backflow into a potable-water system can be prevented using an assembly approved by the water supplier, or a physical separation between the water supply and a potential source of pollution. The water supplier determines the type of backflow-prevention assembly required, based on the existing or potential degree of hazard.

TESTING BACKFLOW PREVENTION ASSEMBLIES

The TCEQ requires testing of all backflow prevention assemblies at installation by a TCEQ-licensed tester. Backflow-prevention assemblies installed to protect against any substance that can make you sick must be tested annually.

HOW CAN I FIND OUT MORE INFORMATION ABOUT BACKFLOW?

For more information about backflow and cross-connection control, visit <www.tceq.state.tx.us/goto/cc>.

 

To all South Grayson SUD's customers who have a copy of their Backflow Prevention Assembly Test Report, please email or mail a copy to our office. If you do not have a Backflow Prevention Assembly Test Report, please get it tested and then send a copy of the report to our office my mail or email.